Research Areas

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Optics & Metrology


There are 1 research centre and 1 laboratory under the Optics & Metrology Group:


Nanoscale Optics
This project focuses on developing new generation non contact high aspect ratio nanoscale features that can find potential applications in semiconductor industry, improving thin film Si solar cell efficiency and for biomedical optics. Both conventional and near filed optics such as evanescent waves and plasmonics are heavily researched over the last few years. Current research focuses on achieving the forecasted technology nodes of sub 10nm as well as generating of new devices using such structures.

Principal Investigator: Associate Professor Murukeshan Vadakke Matham


Multi- modality Biomedical Optics and Imaging
This project aims at developing new generation multi optical and hybrid optical imaging methodologies as well as molecular probes for early disease diagnosis focusing on colon, breast and ocular). High resolution (axial, temporal and spatial) and clinician and patient friendly design adoption are targeted in this research while developing the technology. Two patents are already filed and many technology disclosures are in the pipeline in this challenging area. Multi and Hyperspectral Imaging, High resolution specialty fiber optic probes, Photoacoustic Imaging, Special beam profile assisted imaging will be integrated in a single setting to derive the benefits of different imaging modalities.

Principal Investigator: Associate Professor Murukeshan Vadakke Matham


Improved Broad band absorption thin film solar cells
Tapping natural resources for energy has become the current focus of research all over the world and harnessing of solar energy tops the priority list. In this context, photovoltaics is emerging as a promising technology for converting solar energy into electricity in usable as well as storable forms, renewing the hopes of mankind to solve the energy crisis looming large particularly over the technological progress of the coming generations. Conventional solar cell is not feasible economically at present, in view of the high costs of silicon materials and processing. Therefore thin film solar cells are of great interest in solar cell market because of the small film thickness. But the absorbance of light in the near bandgap region is small and hence structuring of layers and proper configuration of the layered structure of thin film solar cell are very crucial. This project in this context focuses on the specific objectives of achieving improved light absorption and conversion efficiency in thin film solar cells using the proposed strategies. Plasmonics, gap modes concepts will be employed with novel configurations for achieving the targeted conversion efficiency.

Principal Investigator: Associate Professor Murukeshan Vadakke Matham


Near field Optics Controlled random media- Fundamental Investigation with Potential applications
Nearfield optical concepts are introducing a paradigm shift in a wide variety of science and engineering fields and the most significant applications of this fundamental physics-optics concepts have been towards meeting the applied engineering problems of today. Furthermore, non contact optical methodologies for writing patterned structures or features have enabled such near field assisted device fabrication and related applications. Optics technology that focuses on the above mentioned areas has seen the impact of the same with a challenging trend to achieve smaller features at the nanoscale. Integrated near filed concepts exploiting such features and nanoscale metal particles in a random disordered media is one of the latest thrust research area, which is expected to make potential impacts in a wide variety of fields. The major research contents of this project in this context aim at the fundamental research and investigation into such Near field Optics Controlled random media- Both Fundamental Investigation and potential device fabrication will be explored.

Principal Investigator: Associate Professor Murukeshan Vadakke Matham


Feasibility study on image fiber integration into a hyper-spectral imaging unit with a sophisticated mechanical and conceptual design
Multi- or Hyper-spectral imaging is the acquisition of spectra information, together with spatial information. 2D spatial information is generally done via scanning of the sample. However, it was always challenging to integrate speciality optical fibers such as image fibers to integrate into such system for simultaneous imaging and fluorescence sensing which can find specific applications in different targeted fields. This project entitled “Feasibility study on image fiber integration into a hyper-spectral imaging unit with a sophisticated mechanical and conceptual design” has the following main objective:
To investigate and conduct a feasibility study on the physical constraint, to improvise, devise and design a flexible system to couple image fiber into a hyper-spectral imaging unit.

Principal Investigator: Associate Professor Murukeshan Vadakke Matham


Investigations into Digital Analysis of Hyperspectral Data
Hyper-spectral imaging is the acquisition of spectra information, together with spatial information. 2D spatial information is generally done via scanning of the sample. However, a sophisticated software with targeted objectives is a challenge. Hence this project aims at coming up with a digital analysis and classification approach to extract useful information from raw hyper-spectral data. The investigation will primarily be on feasibility and subsequent integration with the hardware.

Principal Investigator: Associate Professor Murukeshan Vadakke Matham


Surface Finish Measurement of Difficult to Access areas and Internal Channels
Traditional surface finish measurement systems are either stylus based or benchtop optical systems. Both are unable to effectively measurement difficult to access areas because of the geometry of the part, or internal channels. Therefore, there is a need to develop a capable measurement system to address this gap. The aim of this project in this context is to research and develop non- contact probe metrology solutions for Surface Finish Measurement of Difficult to Access areas and Internal Channels.

Principal Investigator: Associate Professor Murukeshan Vadakke Matham


Next generation large area dimensional measurement
This project would focus on non-contact optical in-situ measurement techniques to detect feature presence/intensity of feature presence and will serve as an important feed-back loop to adapt the advanced mechanized finishing process. The research will mainly focuses on the diagnostic monitoring that can detect features on the surface, measure sharp edges and represent the surface in 2 D and 3D highlighting the detected features.

Principal Investigator: Associate Professor Murukeshan Vadakke Matham


Ocular imaging of irido-corneal angle with overlay of fluorescent emission distribution
Glaucoma is the leading cause of irreversible blindness worldwide, with primary angle closure glaucoma (PACG) a major form of glaucoma in Singapore and Asia. High resolution anterior segment imaging of the human eye for the diagnosis and management of various eye diseases (including corneal diseases and glaucoma) is an area of unmet need. This is due to limitations with the current available technologies related to the diagnosis and quantification of angle closure.
In this project, we aim to develop a novel anterior segment diagnostic device using self-constructing beam imaging coupled with fluorescence imaging, that can image the drainage pathway (trabecular meshwork) of the eye directly and provide 3D images with better resolution (<10 m) than currently available, as well as explore dynamic features of aqueous humor flow.

Principal Investigator: Associate Professor Murukeshan Vadakke Matham


Feasibility study on underwater sound detection by LASER
This project, funded by Singapore Temasek Laboratory, is to develop a single-point laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) with glint tracking system for detection of underwater acoustic signals from the water surface.

Principal Investigator: Associate Professor Huang Xiaoyang


Ultra-Precision Dimensional Metrology Using Femtosecond Laser Frequency Combs
The research objective of this project is to advance the ultrafast frequency comb technology (which received the Nobel Prize in Physics in 2005) for ultra-precision dimensional metrology to enable next-generation nano-manufacturing, biomedical diagnosis and space sciences. Core applications will include ultra-precision surface profilometry for semiconductor, flat panel display and printed micro-electronics industries, minimally invasive disease diagnosis, and ultrafast LIDARs for next-generation space missions. [read more ...]

  • Ultra-precision dimensional metrology referenced to the standard atomic clocks
  • Minimally invasive disease diagnosis by precision determination of the refractive index
  • Ultrafast LIDARs for next-generation space metrology missions

Principal Investigator: Assistant Professor Kim Young Jin


Precision cellular refractive index measurement based on femtosecond laser frequency comb
The objective of this project is to develop a high-precision metrological principle for earlier detection of circulating tumour cells (CTCs). For highly sensitive detection of cellular refractive indices, a femtosecond laser frequency comb will be utilized as a novel high-precision light source. Two non-invasive label-free optical diagnosis methods – quantitative phase imaging (QPI) and Fabry-Perot interferometry (FPI) – will be combined with FLFC for highly sensitive cellular refractive index measurement. [read more ...]

Principal Investigator: Assistant Professor Kim Young Jin


Design and development of a compact swept source optical coherence tomography (SSOCT) imaging system with enhanced imaging capability for bio imaging applications.
The project aim to develop a novel fiber optic interferometer and galvo mirror based beam delivery system. The system is capable of real-time data acquisition using high speed digitizer and control signal generation for laser beam steering setup for imaging. The SSOCT system uses an efficient wavenumber calibration scheme. The developed system can be applied to 1) In situ and quantitative imaging of bacterial biofilm using OCT/OCM, 2) Nanoparticle based contrast enhancement and photothermal applications, and 3) Anterior chamber imaging for Glaucoma detection. [read more ...]

Principal Investigator: Associate Professor Seah Leong Keey